• Me: I wanna do something
  • Anxiety: 
  • Anxiety: 
  • Anxiety: 
  • Anxiety: 
  • Anxiety: 
  • Anxiety: No you dont
  • Me: But
  • Anxiety: No

 posted 1 hour ago · 87578
 varrgulf

freakingpotter:

We’ve come full circle!

BLEGG IS A BIRD! 

I swear to god I’m a serious person. *cough*notreally*cough*



popculturebrain:

Chris Pratt Douchemaster McChest





starrysleeper:

x

a gif set to prove that angels exist



intrauterine:

"Depression is such a cruel punishment. There are no fevers, no rashes, no blood tests to send people scurrying in concern. Just the slow erosion of the self, as insidious as any cancer. And, like cancer, it is essentially a solitary experience. A room in hell with only your name on the door."



A Bit of Fry and Laurie - 4x03



daysoffuturepasta:

sagansense:

phoenixfloaz:

The Scully EffectOne of the most frustrating aspects of this scarcity is that we know just how significant an influence powerful female, scientist role models can have on young women.Perhaps the most prominent example of this power has come to be known as the “Scully Effect.” Named for Special Agent Dana Scully, the medical doctor and FBI agent who was one half of the investigative team on “The X-Files”, the Scully Effect accounts for the notable increase in women who pursued careers in science, medicine, and law enforcement as a result of living with Dana Scully over the nine years “The X-Files” ran on Fox.The show has been off the air for more than a decade. Yet the character of Dana Scully remains a powerful example of how a dynamic female character whose primary pursuit is science—not romantic relationships—can have a lasting impact on our culture.
— by Christopher Zumski Finke (x)

Related: Women In Science

It is 2014, and Dana Scully is still one of the most influential feminist characters to ever appear in mainstream popular media, so when she crosses your dashboard, you take off your hat and you stand and salute her, godammit.

daysoffuturepasta:

sagansense:

phoenixfloaz:

The Scully Effect

One of the most frustrating aspects of this scarcity is that we know just how significant an influence powerful female, scientist role models can have on young women.

Perhaps the most prominent example of this power has come to be known as the “Scully Effect.” Named for Special Agent Dana Scully, the medical doctor and FBI agent who was one half of the investigative team on “The X-Files”, the Scully Effect accounts for the notable increase in women who pursued careers in science, medicine, and law enforcement as a result of living with Dana Scully over the nine years “The X-Files” ran on Fox.

The show has been off the air for more than a decade. Yet the character of Dana Scully remains a powerful example of how a dynamic female character whose primary pursuit is science—not romantic relationships—can have a lasting impact on our culture.

— by Christopher Zumski Finke (x)

Related: Women In Science

It is 2014, and Dana Scully is still one of the most influential feminist characters to ever appear in mainstream popular media, so when she crosses your dashboard, you take off your hat and you stand and salute her, godammit.




erin__eva: Just another day at work. Thank you @hrhchriscolfer for being so lovely! #glee #chriscolfer

erin__eva: Just another day at work. Thank you @hrhchriscolfer for being so lovely! #glee #chriscolfer